'Labor-force Participation Rates of the Population Age 55 and Older, 2011: After the Economic Downturn' and 'Employer and Worker Contributions to Health Savings Accounts and Health Reimbursement Arrangements, 2006–2011'

February 2012, Vol. 33, No. 2
Paperback, 20 pp.
PDF, 2,240 kb
Employee Benefit Research Institute, 2012

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Executive Summary

Labor-force Participation Rates of the Population Age 55 and Older, 2011: After the Economic Downturn


WOMEN DRIVING THE TRENDS: The labor-force participation rate for those age 55 and older has remained above its level before the economic downturn. For those ages 55–64, this is almost exclusively due to the increase of women in the work force; the male participation rate is flat to declining.


TREND WILL CONTINUE: The recent economic downturn did not alter the trend of older workers increasingly being in the labor force; rather, it appears that this remains the trend, as more opportunities for older workers exist and there is a greater necessity for them to remain in the labor force to accumulate sufficient or adequate resources for retirement.


Employer and Worker Contributions to Health Savings Accounts and Health Reimbursement Arrangements, 2006–2011


HSA AND HRA DATA: This report presents findings from the 2011 EBRI/MGA Consumer Engagement in Health Care Survey, as well as earlier surveys, examining the availability of health reimbursement arrangement (HRA) and health savings account (HSA)-eligible plans (consumer-driven health plans, or CDHPs). It also looks at employer and individual contribution behavior.


EMPLOYER CONTRIBUTION LEVELS FALLING: The percentage of workers reporting that their employer contributes to the account was unchanged. However, among those with an employer contribution, overall contribution levels have fallen.


INDIVIDUAL CONTRIBUTION LEVELS INCREASING: Individuals with employee-only coverage increased their contribution levels, but those with family coverage did not. Persons in lower-income households did not increase their contributions; however, those in higher-income households did.